Difference between revisions of "Dynamic height"

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#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(''Also called'' geodynamic height.) The height of a point in the [[atmosphere]]  expressed in a unit proportional to the [[geopotential]] at that point.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">Since the geopotential at [[altitude]] ''z'' is numerically equal to the [[work]] done when a [[particle]] of  unit mass is lifted from [[sea level]] up to this height, the [[dimensions]] of dynamic height are those  of [[potential energy]] per unit mass. The [[standard]] unit of dynamic height is the [[dynamic meter]]  (or [[geodynamic meter]]). One of the practical advantages of the dynamic height over the geometric  height is that when the former is introduced into the [[hydrostatic equation]] the height acceleration  of [[gravity]] is eliminated. In meteorological height calculations [[geopotential height]] is more often  used than dynamic height. In [[oceanography]], dynamic computations are also based upon units  of dynamic height (or dynamic depth).</div><br/> </div>
 
#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(''Also called'' geodynamic height.) The height of a point in the [[atmosphere]]  expressed in a unit proportional to the [[geopotential]] at that point.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">Since the geopotential at [[altitude]] ''z'' is numerically equal to the [[work]] done when a [[particle]] of  unit mass is lifted from [[sea level]] up to this height, the [[dimensions]] of dynamic height are those  of [[potential energy]] per unit mass. The [[standard]] unit of dynamic height is the [[dynamic meter]]  (or [[geodynamic meter]]). One of the practical advantages of the dynamic height over the geometric  height is that when the former is introduced into the [[hydrostatic equation]] the height acceleration  of [[gravity]] is eliminated. In meteorological height calculations [[geopotential height]] is more often  used than dynamic height. In [[oceanography]], dynamic computations are also based upon units  of dynamic height (or dynamic depth).</div><br/> </div>
#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">In [[oceanography]], represents the ability of a column of water to do [[work]] due to differences  in [[geopotential]] (the potential for [[gravity]] to do work because of height of the water relative to  some reference level).</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">The dynamic height is computed from the measured [[density]] distribution. [[Geopotential height]]  differences, expressed by changes in dynamic [[topography]], are a measure of the horizontal [[pressure  gradient]] force.</div><br/> </div>
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#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">In [[oceanography]], represents the ability of a column of water to do [[work]] due to differences  in [[geopotential]] (the potential for [[gravity]] to do work because of height of the water relative to  some reference level).</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">The dynamic height is computed from the measured [[density]] distribution. [[geopotential height|Geopotential height]]  differences, expressed by changes in dynamic [[topography]], are a measure of the horizontal [[pressure gradient|pressure  gradient]] force.</div><br/> </div>
 
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Latest revision as of 15:51, 25 April 2012



dynamic height

  1. (Also called geodynamic height.) The height of a point in the atmosphere expressed in a unit proportional to the geopotential at that point.

    Since the geopotential at altitude z is numerically equal to the work done when a particle of unit mass is lifted from sea level up to this height, the dimensions of dynamic height are those of potential energy per unit mass. The standard unit of dynamic height is the dynamic meter (or geodynamic meter). One of the practical advantages of the dynamic height over the geometric height is that when the former is introduced into the hydrostatic equation the height acceleration of gravity is eliminated. In meteorological height calculations geopotential height is more often used than dynamic height. In oceanography, dynamic computations are also based upon units of dynamic height (or dynamic depth).

  2. In oceanography, represents the ability of a column of water to do work due to differences in geopotential (the potential for gravity to do work because of height of the water relative to some reference level).

    The dynamic height is computed from the measured density distribution. Geopotential height differences, expressed by changes in dynamic topography, are a measure of the horizontal pressure gradient force.


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