Difference between revisions of "Interference"

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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">The superposition of two or more waves resulting in an [[amplitude]] of the composite  [[wave]] not necessarily the algebraic sum of the amplitudes of each of its components.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">The simplest example is the superposition of two one-dimensional [[scalar]] waves with equal  amplitude ''A'':  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie10.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie10]]</blockquote></div> where  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie11.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie11]]</blockquote></div>  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie12.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie12]]</blockquote></div> The [[amplitude]] ''B'' of the sum of these waves lies between 0 (destructive interference) and 2''A''  (constructive interference) depending on the phase difference &#x00394;&#x003c6; = &#x003c6;<sub>2</sub> &minus; &#x003c6;<sub>1</sub>:  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie13.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie13]]</blockquote></div>  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie14.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie14]]</blockquote></div> Destructive and constructive interference are the two extremes of interference not, as is often  implied, the only two possibilities. Interference requires [[coherence]] of the waves, by which is meant  a definite and fixed [[phase]] difference between them.</div><br/> </div>
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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">The superposition of two or more waves resulting in an [[amplitude]] of the composite  [[wave]] not necessarily the algebraic sum of the amplitudes of each of its components.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">The simplest example is the superposition of two one-dimensional [[scalar]] waves with equal  amplitude ''A'':  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie10.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie10]]</blockquote></div> where  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie11.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie11]]</blockquote></div>  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie12.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie12]]</blockquote></div> The [[amplitude]] ''B'' of the sum of these waves lies between 0 (destructive interference) and 2''A''  (constructive interference) depending on the phase difference &#x00394;&#x003c6; = &#x003c6;<sub>2</sub> - &#x003c6;<sub>1</sub>:  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie13.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie13]]</blockquote></div>  <div class="display-formula"><blockquote>[[File:ams2001glos-Ie14.gif|link=|center|ams2001glos-Ie14]]</blockquote></div> Destructive and constructive interference are the two extremes of interference not, as is often  implied, the only two possibilities. Interference requires [[coherence]] of the waves, by which is meant  a definite and fixed [[phase]] difference between them.</div><br/> </div>
 
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Latest revision as of 15:29, 20 February 2012



interference

The superposition of two or more waves resulting in an amplitude of the composite wave not necessarily the algebraic sum of the amplitudes of each of its components.

The simplest example is the superposition of two one-dimensional scalar waves with equal amplitude A:
ams2001glos-Ie10
where
ams2001glos-Ie11
ams2001glos-Ie12
The amplitude B of the sum of these waves lies between 0 (destructive interference) and 2A (constructive interference) depending on the phase difference Δφ = φ2 - φ1:
ams2001glos-Ie13
ams2001glos-Ie14
Destructive and constructive interference are the two extremes of interference not, as is often implied, the only two possibilities. Interference requires coherence of the waves, by which is meant a definite and fixed phase difference between them.


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