Difference between revisions of "Landspout"

From Glossary of Meteorology
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#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(Rare.) A [[tornado]].</div><br/> </div>
 
#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(Rare.) A [[tornado]].</div><br/> </div>
#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">Colloquial expression describing tornadoes occurring with a parent [[cloud]] in its growth stage  and with its [[vorticity]] originating in the [[boundary layer]].</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">The parent cloud does not contain a preexisting midlevel [[mesocyclone]]. The landspout was so  named because it looks like a weak, Florida Keys [[waterspout]] over land. <br/>''See'' [[nonsupercell tornado]].</div><br/> </div><div class="reference">Bluestein, H. B. 1985. The formation of a &ldquo;landspout&rdquo; in a &ldquo;broken-line&rdquo; squall line in Oklahoma. Preprints,  14th Conf. on Severe Local Storms. Indianapolis, . 267&ndash;270. </div><br/>  
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#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">Colloquial expression describing tornadoes occurring with a parent [[cloud]] in its growth stage  and with its [[vorticity]] originating in the [[boundary layer]].</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">The parent cloud does not contain a preexisting midlevel [[mesocyclone]]. The landspout was so  named because it looks like a weak, Florida Keys [[waterspout]] over land. <br/>''See'' [[nonsupercell tornado]].</div><br/> </div><div class="reference">Bluestein, H. B. 1985. The formation of a "landspout" in a "broken-line" squall line in Oklahoma. Preprints,  14th Conf. on Severe Local Storms. Indianapolis, . 267&ndash;270. </div><br/>  
 
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Latest revision as of 15:34, 20 February 2012



landspout

  1. (Rare.) A tornado.

  2. Colloquial expression describing tornadoes occurring with a parent cloud in its growth stage and with its vorticity originating in the boundary layer.

    The parent cloud does not contain a preexisting midlevel mesocyclone. The landspout was so named because it looks like a weak, Florida Keys waterspout over land.
    See nonsupercell tornado.

    Bluestein, H. B. 1985. The formation of a "landspout" in a "broken-line" squall line in Oklahoma. Preprints, 14th Conf. on Severe Local Storms. Indianapolis, . 267–270.