Difference between revisions of "Radio blackout"

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== radio blackout ==
 
== radio blackout ==
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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(''Also called'' arctic blackout, blackout, polar blackout.) A prolonged period of [[fading]] of radio communications that occurs naturally in the polar regions.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">An arctic blackout may last for days during periods of intense [[auroral]] activity.</div><br/> </div>
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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">A prolonged period of fading or faded radio communications, primarily in the [[Hf|HF]] range from [[ionosphere|ionospheric]] changes because of increased solar activity, in particular [[solar flare|solar flares]] of the C-class level or higher on the sunlit side of Earth. Radio blackouts due to solar flares can last from minutes to hours. [[solar proton event|Solar proton events]] can also cause long-term radio blackouts over the polar regions for days; these are known as [[polar cap absorption events]] (PCAs). Radio blackouts due to solar flares of the M-class level and higher are classified using the NOAA [[r-scale|R-Scale]].”</div><br/> </div>
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<p>Space Weather Prediction Center, 2018: Solar flares (Radio blackouts). Accessed 14 August 2018. Available at <nowiki>https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/phenomena/solar-flares-radio-blackouts</nowiki>.</p><br/>
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<p>''Term edited 14 August 2018.''</p>
  
 
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Latest revision as of 19:28, 14 August 2018



radio blackout

A prolonged period of fading or faded radio communications, primarily in the HF range from ionospheric changes because of increased solar activity, in particular solar flares of the C-class level or higher on the sunlit side of Earth. Radio blackouts due to solar flares can last from minutes to hours. Solar proton events can also cause long-term radio blackouts over the polar regions for days; these are known as polar cap absorption events (PCAs). Radio blackouts due to solar flares of the M-class level and higher are classified using the NOAA R-Scale.”

Space Weather Prediction Center, 2018: Solar flares (Radio blackouts). Accessed 14 August 2018. Available at https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/phenomena/solar-flares-radio-blackouts.


Term edited 14 August 2018.