Difference between revisions of "Rotor cloud"

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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(Sometimes called [[roll cloud]].) A turbulent, altocumulus-type [[cloud formation]] found  in the lee of some large mountain barriers, particularly in the Sierra Nevada near Bishop, California.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">The air in the [[cloud]] rotates around an axis parallel to the range. The term was first applied to  clouds of this type in Europe, especially in the Riesengebirge and on Crossfell. Rotor clouds  are often associated with [[lee wave]] (lenticular) clouds that may be present above. <br/>''See'' [[Bishop wave]].</div><br/> </div>
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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(Sometimes called [[roll cloud]].) A turbulent, altocumulus-type [[cloud formation]] found  in the lee of some large mountain barriers, particularly in the Sierra Nevada near Bishop, California.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">The air in the [[cloud]] rotates around an axis parallel to the range. The term was first applied to  clouds of this type in Europe, especially in the Riesengebirge and on Crossfell. Rotor clouds  are often associated with [[lee wave]] (lenticular) clouds that may be present above. </div><br/> <div class="paragraph">''See'' [[Bishop wave]].</div><br/> </div>
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<br/>''(Term edited 4/8/2014)''
  
 
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Latest revision as of 08:34, 22 May 2014



rotor cloud

(Sometimes called roll cloud.) A turbulent, altocumulus-type cloud formation found in the lee of some large mountain barriers, particularly in the Sierra Nevada near Bishop, California.

The air in the cloud rotates around an axis parallel to the range. The term was first applied to clouds of this type in Europe, especially in the Riesengebirge and on Crossfell. Rotor clouds are often associated with lee wave (lenticular) clouds that may be present above.



(Term edited 4/8/2014)


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