Difference between revisions of "Storm"

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#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">Any disturbed state of the [[atmosphere]], especially as affecting the earth's surface, implying  inclement and possibly destructive weather.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">There are at least three somewhat different viewpoints of storms. 1) In [[synoptic meteorology]], a storm is a complete individual [[disturbance]] identified on [[synoptic charts]] as a complex of  [[pressure]], [[wind]], [[clouds]], [[precipitation]], etc., or identified by such mesometeorological means as  [[radar]] or [[sferics]]. Thus, storms range in scale from [[tornadoes]] and [[thunderstorms]], through [[tropical  cyclones]], to widespread [[extratropical cyclones]]. 2) From a local and special interest viewpoint, a storm is a [[transient]] occurrence identified by its most destructive or spectacular aspect(s). In this manner we speak of [[rainstorms]], [[windstorms]], [[hailstorms]], [[snowstorms]], etc. Notable special cases are [[blizzards]], [[ice storms]], [[sandstorms]], and [[duststorms]]. 3) To a hydrologist, &ldquo;storm&rdquo; alludes  primarily to the space- and time-distribution of [[rainfall]] over a given region. <br/>''See'' [[local storm]], [[severe storm]].</div><br/> </div>
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#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">A disturbed state of Earth's [[atmosphere]], which can manifest itself in [[temperature]], [[humidity]], [[pressure]], [[wind]] [[velocity]], [[cloud cover]], [[lightning]], and [[precipitation]]. Storms are organized [[disturbance|disturbances]] that range in size from meters to a few kilometers ([[microscale]], e.g., [[tornado|tornadoes]]), to a few to several hundred kilometers ([[mesoscale]], e.g., [[mesoscale convective system|mesoscale convective systems]]), to many hundreds of kilometers ([[synoptic]], e.g., [[extratropical cyclone|extratropical cyclones]]).</div><br/><div class="paragraph">Inclement and potentially destructive [[weather]] is often implied with a storm; threats can include heavy precipitation, [[flash flood|flash flooding]]/[[river]] [[flood|flooding]], and high winds. From a local and special-interest viewpoint, a storm is a [[transient]] occurrence identified by its most destructive or spectacular aspect(s). In this manner we speak of [[rainstorm|rainstorms]], [[windstorm|windstorms]], [[hailstorm|hailstorms]], [[snowstorm|snowstorms]], etc. Notable special cases are [[blizzard|blizzards]], [[ice storm|icestorms]], [[sandstorm|sandstorms]], and [[duststorm|duststorms]].</div><br/><div class="paragraph">''See [[thunderstorm]], [[local storm]], [[severe storm]].</div><br/> </div>
#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition"><br/>''See'' [[magnetic storm]]</div><br/> </div>
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#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">For a [[hydrology]]-specific application, ''see'' [[design storm]].</div><br/> </div>
#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(<br/>''Also called'' storm wind, violent storm.) In the [[Beaufort wind scale]], a [[wind]] with a speed from 56 to 63 knots (64 to 72 mph) or Beaufort Number 11 (Force 11).</div><br/> </div>
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#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">For a [[space weather]]&ndash;specific application application, ''see'' [[magnetic storm]].</div><br/> </div>
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#<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(''Also called'' storm wind, violent storm.) In the [[Beaufort wind scale]], a wind with a speed from 56 to 63 knots (64 to 72 mph, ~29 to 32 m s<sup>&minus;1</sup>) or Beaufort number 11 (force 11).</div><br/> </div>
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<p>''Term edited 1 March 2021.''</p>
  
 
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Latest revision as of 05:27, 1 March 2021



storm

  1. A disturbed state of Earth's atmosphere, which can manifest itself in temperature, humidity, pressure, wind velocity, cloud cover, lightning, and precipitation. Storms are organized disturbances that range in size from meters to a few kilometers (microscale, e.g., tornadoes), to a few to several hundred kilometers (mesoscale, e.g., mesoscale convective systems), to many hundreds of kilometers (synoptic, e.g., extratropical cyclones).

    Inclement and potentially destructive weather is often implied with a storm; threats can include heavy precipitation, flash flooding/river flooding, and high winds. From a local and special-interest viewpoint, a storm is a transient occurrence identified by its most destructive or spectacular aspect(s). In this manner we speak of rainstorms, windstorms, hailstorms, snowstorms, etc. Notable special cases are blizzards, icestorms, sandstorms, and duststorms.


  2. For a hydrology-specific application, see design storm.

  3. For a space weather–specific application application, see magnetic storm.

  4. (Also called storm wind, violent storm.) In the Beaufort wind scale, a wind with a speed from 56 to 63 knots (64 to 72 mph, ~29 to 32 m s−1) or Beaufort number 11 (force 11).

Term edited 1 March 2021.