Difference between revisions of "Thermocouple"

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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">A [[temperature-sensing element]] that converts [[thermal energy]] directly into electrical  [[energy]].</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">In its basic form it consists of two dissimilar metallic electrical conductors connected in a closed  loop. Each junction forms a thermocouple. One thermocouple is maintained at a known [[temperature]]  (usually 0&deg;C or a measured temperature) and the other thermocouple is used to measure  the unknown temperature. The [[signal]] voltage is a function of the temperature, and the smooth  curve can be handled with a simple [[linear]] fit over a moderate [[temperature range]]. Different  materials have different curves. Popular thermocouples (and change in voltage per &deg;C) include iron-  constantan (50 mv per &deg;C), copper-constantan (38 mv per &deg;C), and various platinum alloys.  Thermocouples are also important in home furnaces to detect the pilot light or that the fuel has  ignited. A chain of thermocouples, called a [[thermopile]], can be used as a power supply if a source  of heat and cold is available.</div><br/> </div>
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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">A [[temperature-sensing element]] that converts [[thermal energy]] directly into electrical  [[energy]].</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">In its basic form it consists of two dissimilar metallic electrical conductors connected in a closed  loop. Each junction forms a thermocouple. One thermocouple is maintained at a known [[temperature]]  (usually 0&#x000b0;C or a measured temperature) and the other thermocouple is used to measure  the unknown temperature. The [[signal]] voltage is a function of the temperature, and the smooth  curve can be handled with a simple [[linear]] fit over a moderate [[temperature range]]. Different  materials have different curves. Popular thermocouples (and change in voltage per &#x000b0;C) include iron-  constantan (50 mv per &#x000b0;C), copper-constantan (38 mv per &#x000b0;C), and various platinum alloys.  Thermocouples are also important in home furnaces to detect the pilot light or that the fuel has  ignited. A chain of thermocouples, called a [[thermopile]], can be used as a power supply if a source  of heat and cold is available.</div><br/> </div>
 
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Latest revision as of 16:18, 20 February 2012



thermocouple

A temperature-sensing element that converts thermal energy directly into electrical energy.

In its basic form it consists of two dissimilar metallic electrical conductors connected in a closed loop. Each junction forms a thermocouple. One thermocouple is maintained at a known temperature (usually 0°C or a measured temperature) and the other thermocouple is used to measure the unknown temperature. The signal voltage is a function of the temperature, and the smooth curve can be handled with a simple linear fit over a moderate temperature range. Different materials have different curves. Popular thermocouples (and change in voltage per °C) include iron- constantan (50 mv per °C), copper-constantan (38 mv per °C), and various platinum alloys. Thermocouples are also important in home furnaces to detect the pilot light or that the fuel has ignited. A chain of thermocouples, called a thermopile, can be used as a power supply if a source of heat and cold is available.