Difference between revisions of "Undulatus"

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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(<br/>''Also called'' [[billow cloud]], windrow cloud, wave cloud.) A [[cloud variety]] composed of  merged or separate elements that are elongated and parallel, either suggestive of [[ocean waves]] or  arranged in ranks and files.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">Sometimes two distinct [[wave]] systems are apparent (biundulatus). The formation is by [[gravity  waves]] that exhibit broad, nearly parallel lines of [[cloud]] oriented normal to the [[wind direction]],  with cloud bases near an [[inversion]] surface. <br/>''See'' [[cloud classification]]; <br/>''compare'' [[cloud streets]].</div><br/> </div>
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<div class="definition"><div class="short_definition">(''Also called'' [[billow cloud]], windrow cloud, wave cloud.) A [[cloud variety]] composed of  merged or separate elements that are elongated and parallel, either suggestive of [[ocean waves]] or  arranged in ranks and files.</div><br/> <div class="paragraph">Sometimes two distinct [[wave]] systems are apparent (biundulatus). The formation is by [[gravity  waves]] that exhibit broad, nearly parallel lines of [[cloud]] oriented normal to the [[wind direction]],  with cloud bases near an [[inversion]] surface. <br/>''See'' [[cloud classification]]; <br/>''compare'' [[cloud streets]].</div><br/> </div>
 
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Latest revision as of 16:22, 20 February 2012



undulatus

(Also called billow cloud, windrow cloud, wave cloud.) A cloud variety composed of merged or separate elements that are elongated and parallel, either suggestive of ocean waves or arranged in ranks and files.

Sometimes two distinct wave systems are apparent (biundulatus). The formation is by gravity waves that exhibit broad, nearly parallel lines of cloud oriented normal to the wind direction, with cloud bases near an inversion surface.
See cloud classification;
compare cloud streets.